Where do I start?

As-salamu ‘alaykum warahmatullaahi wabarakatuh, 

There are so many brothers and sisters who want to persue the path of learning arabic but where to start always seems to be the obstacle. What books shall I use? Which institute is best? Can I teach myself? How long does it take to learn arabic? These questions are so vital yet it seems that there aren’t enough people to answer our questions and satisfy our thirst. There is so much information on arabic language that it has just reached a super overload. Everything is there yet nothing is there. Inshaa’Allaah, with this article I hope to shed some light on the various books you can use to start off your arabic studies. I will state the advantages and disadvantages and I hope by the end of it that you have some idea on what book will suit you. 
I will go through the books in no particular order:

Kitaabul Asaasi

 
 
 
These books consist of the three volumes. The first two volumes have arabic-english dictonary at the back to help you with clarification of any arabic words that you don’t understand or possibly have misunderstood. The first volume focuses on introducing the arabic language to you and your vocabulary is boosted by the numerous coversations. Your writing skills are also given a run for their money due to the amount of exercises you’re required to cover in correlation to the conversation you have studied.

Grammar is introduced in volume one. Nonetheless, there isn’t a major need for you to understand the gammatic state or its essense. Rather all that is required is that you’re able to use the grammar when needed. It is in Vol two that you start doing ‘Iraab and go into the nitty gritty of grammar and how to use arabic dictonary. But it is in Vol three that things start to get spicy, the doors to the gems of arabic are opened and they are yours to enjoy. You look at arabic literature, tafseer, fiqh, history and poetry to mention a few.  

However, there is alot of conversation to go through espically in Vol one and can seem absouletly tedious and pointless to someone who wants to dive into being able to benefit from Islaamic texts. You spend alot of time building on vocabulary and grammar is prosponed for a later stage when the student is deemed to be more capable of grasping it. In addition if you’re persuing the arabic language so that you may understand the Qur’aan and islaamic texts then you may have to wait abit longer. With these books, patience is definately the key. Furthermore, it is geared towards generally being able to speak arabic and not merely about religious matters. Some may consider this a negative aspect but if you want to master arabic then it is a gem worth capturing.

 

 
Madinah books
 
 
 
 
 
 
The madinah books consist of three books. Covering a wide spectrum of grammar with the religion being its base. These books are great for combaining references from the Qur’aan and Sunnah while teaching arabic. In contract to Kitaabul Asaasi, you’re introduced grammar from an early stage. In book three you will notice that special attention is given in quoting Qur’aanic ayaat (pl. ayah) and ahadeeth (pl.hadeeth) to illustrate the rule (s) being discussed in a dialogue form in each lesson.
As these books were designed with English speakers in mind, it is a must-have for pretty much all english speakers who take on the journey to learn arabic. However, these books are never sufficient to get someone to a high level in the arabic language. Although you may know more Islaamic oriented terminologies and have the upper hand over someone who may be in Vol one of Kitaabul Asaasi, it is a brief moment. In the end, your knowledge will be of a lower standard when you finish all three books in comparison to someone who has studied all three volumes of kitaabul asaasi. In addition the systemisation is poor, it moves from easy and hard too fast in my opinion and there is no gradual build up. Also grammar is introduced straight away which can be overwhelming and not necessarily beneficial in the long run.
 
 
Al-‘Arabiyya Bayna Yadayk
 
 
Al-‘Arabiyyah bayna yadayk series comes in three books. The great thing about these books is as though they have tried to deal with the problems of Kitaabul Asaasi and Madinah books (though that was never the purpose of it!). It covers alot of vocabulary and introduces the students to grammar later and gradually rather than pushing them at the deep end before they can swim.
Much like Madinah books it is more Islaamic inclined and fulfills the desire for the student of knowledge to learn the language of the Qur’aan.

However, much like Madinah books, it does not go into much depth and you will find that in majority cases that students who have completed all three books will move onto the third volume of Kitaabul Asaasi to reach a higher competency.

 

The three types of books mentioned above are the most famous and most used around the world in teaching the arabic language. These books have advantages and disadvantages and each institute will have adopted certain books to use for various reasons. Which institute to go to will depend on what books you want to study. Do you want to know sufficient arabic to allow you to know the basic or do you want to master the arabic language?

 

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Ajroomiyyah

The matn of ajroomiyyah is excellent, it goes through grammar in the form of poetry. It teaches the student all that he/she requires in digesting arabic grammar. However anything else is out of the window. Just because you can go through the ‘Iraab of any sentence does not mean it will aid you with reading books. This book is good for someone who knows arabic and wants to drill grammar properly but for the English beginner, it usually does not benefit them much. They tend to be left scared and demoralised because it is ‘too hard’. Having said that, you can study the Ajroomiyyah and still reach a good level but it will require you to learn other texts such as Alfiyyah Ibn Malik, Qadr An-Nada and so forth.

 

Nahw Waadih

You can get this book in 3 small books or in one book that has three ajzaa (pl. Juz). It is great for Nahw. The great thing about this book is the fact that it has summary of each grammar rule and then you have exercises to go through. However, much like Ajroomiyyah, your vocabulary will lack and you will need to study other texts to further your studies. It does not stand alone.

Ajroomiyyah and Nahw Waadih are the skeleton, you need flesh and skin to adorn it with. The skeleton alone can not stand, though beneficial, alone it defeats its benefits.

Ibn Saud Text

I don’t know a great deal about this curriculum. However, brother ubaydullaah shared the following informations:

Regarding the Ibn Saud Texts, The books are separated into 4 levels. If one was to complete all four levels, they would have a strong grasp on all subjects in Arabic. Each level is put into three sections; al-`uloom al-Deeniyyah, al-lughah-al-Arabiyyah and Kutub al-Musaahabah. Also, Each subject has it’s own book. The subjects are as follows:

(Level 1) – Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), Kitabus-Suwar (limarhalatil-Istima`), al-qira’a wal-Kitabah, at-Ta`beer, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

(Level 2) – Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), al-Hadeeth ash-Shareef, al-Qira`ah, at-Ta`beer, al-Kitabah, an-Nahw, as-Sarf, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

(Level 3) – al-Fiqh, at-Tawheed, Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), al-Hadeeth ash-Shareef, al-ADAB, al-Qira`ah, at-Ta`beer, al-Kitabah, an-Nahw, as-Sarf, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

(Level 4) – at-Taareekh al-Islamiy, al-Fiqh, at-Tawheed, Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), al-Hadeeth ash-Shareef, al-BALAGHAH wan-NAQD, al-ADAB, al-Qira`ah, at-Ta`beer, al-Kitabah, an-Nahw, as-Sarf, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

Unfortubately, these books aren’t available for purchase but I heard if you contact the University, they will send it to you, otherwise you can purchase the books from some Maktabaat I know in Cairo or can be downloaded from kalamullaah.

I have stated briefly above about several books, by no means does this mean that these are the only books, as a matter of fact, I’ve only scratched the surface. There are numerous books out there that are speficially designed in teaching the arabic language. This article was merely a taster on the various arabic books that you may wish to study from. I hope this was of benefit and that you can take one step forward in fulfilling your dreams in studying the arabic language! If you have any questions please feel free to ask and if I can help then Inshaa’Allaah I will not hesitate in assisting you.
Wabillaahi tawfeeq.
 
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Comments on: "Where do I start?" (44)

  1. JZK, that was really helpful, so say i want to study arabic and be really good, what books would u say i shud do? i want to go abroad, maybe yemen, do u know any good places i can go? or can i learn in UK just as much? do u know any good places that teach arabic well in UK? sorry 4 the loads of questions lol

  2. Wa iyyaki. It depends on what you want to gain from it and what sort of book content you want. If you’re easily bored and dislike excess conversation then I would recommend Al’Arabiyya bayna yadayk. If you want to have an overall understanding of the language then Kitaabul Asaasi. It depends on you. Also Kitaabul Asaasi is not religious-based text so you will have to be patient or go to an institute where they teach you maybe qisas books along with it to increase your Islaamic knowledge.

    Sadly I don’t know enough about Yemen, I know Dammaj is good although life isn’t luxury so you have to prepare yourself for the difficult living style.

    In the UK, where abouts? In london there are alot of faciliates, from Tayyibun to online studying.

    Don’t worry about the questions! If I can help I will bi’idnillaah.

    Hayyakillaah

  3. AbuSalahudeen said:

    Salam,

    Jazakallah Khair, Mashallah this is excellent.

    Im studying the Madinah series inshallah ill be done soon, inshallah Im planning for my studies in Egypt and Ive decided to do Kitabul Assassi with Fajr, probably private classes to benefit as much as possible.

    One question which book covers more Vocab Kitab ul assiss or Bayna Yadyk?

    May Allah reward u akhi.

  4. Wa iyyak.

    May Allaah make your studies fruitful and beneficial, Aameen.

    It depends what vocabulary you have in mind, also are you talking about all 3 vol of Kitaabul Asaasi in comparison to Al’Arabiyya? I would say Kitaabul Asaasi merely for that fact that it is about teaching all the generals within the arabic language and not limiting just to religious text. As for Islaamic oriented vocabulary then I would say Al-‘Arabiyya wallaahu’allaam.

  5. abu hafitha said:

    as salaamu alaikum
    correct me if i’m wrong but doesnt the fajr center finish bayna yadayk in 1 year? what books do they use after that? barakalaahu feekum
    also are you in egypt?

  6. JZK, I tink i’ll do al-arabiya then, i’m in london, do u know any1 teaching these books here?

    yea i heard about damaj and dat its quite difficult, i’ll c. thanx for ur quick reply!

    this article is reli good mashAllah!

  7. Abu hafidha-They go through the books in about 9 months that is excluding the breaks they take in every level so a year would seem correct. I don’t know personally about the types of books they use but I would assume that aspects of the further studies are selected from Kitaabul Asaasi as well as other texts of their choice.

    No I’m not Egypt at the moment sadly.

    Fayrouz-wa iyyaki, Try Tayyibun for a private class and tell them that you wish to be taught using Al-‘Arabiyya bayna yadayk, they may find someone for you. However, don’t expect it to be cheap. Last time I recall private class being 15 pound an hour. The cost may have changed though, wallaahu’3llam.

  8. JZK, i’m gonna contact dem, make dua for me sis and thanx once again, liking your blog and the reali helpful articles!

  9. IbnMuhammad said:

    Salam

    If I was to study Kitabul Assiss, what else can I do to build up strong Islamic Text Vocabulary?

  10. Fayrouz-Inshaa’Allaah I’ll make dua for you!

    IbnMuhammad-It depends what vol of Kitaabul Asaasi you’re doing, in vol one, I would advise maybe getting some arabic qisas story espically designed for young children. If you’re on vol two of the book though I would recommend Qisasul Anbiyaa by Ibn Katheer (rahimahullaah). It is simple yet complex enough for you to build your vocabulary on. You can find PDF files online or you can purchase it at an Islaamic bookshop, its about £8 I believe.

    If you want short qisas or qisasul anbiyaa online then let me know, I’ll find the links Inshaa’Allaah.

    Abu hafidha-there is a three bedroom apartment in madinatul nasr, You know Masjid darul arqam, the building is literally opposite it and I think its about £250 a month rent for all 3 bedrooms, the owner of the apartments is a pious old man, I can get his contact if you want, let me know Inshaa’Allaah!

  11. IbnMuhammad said:

    Salam,

    jazakallah Khair, How many Qisas books are there?

  12. wa ‘alaykum salaam,

    wa iyyak, do you mean the short qisa books for children or qisasul anbiyaa? If it is the former then there are hundreds, and if it the latter then there is only one, to my knowledge, wallaahu’3llam.

  13. IbnMuhammad said:

    Salam,

    I think Im talking about this childrens books.

    Akhi do you know anything about Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud University Program, which used by Qortoba as one of main text taught. I know its very Islamic orientated, but if you have any knowledge of the content it would be great.

    Jazakallah Khairun

  14. Wa ‘alaykum salam,

    There are atleast 100 of these small books, I’ll try and scan a few pages (assuming my scanner works!) Inshaa’Allaah.

    I don’t know much about Ibn Saud texts, my only knowledge of it is that they are Islaamic oriented and has alot of exercises and stories in comparison to Madeenah books. In terms of the content of Nahw and Sarf it covers, I don’t know.

    Wa iyyak

  15. IbnMuhammad said:

    Salam,

    Jazakallah Khair, that would be great to have a look at these books.

    Do these books follow some sort of order?

    Akhi do you know much about Qortoba Institute?

    w/s

  16. ibn Ahmed said:

    wa ‘alaikumassalam

    I went to Qortoba in Alexandria for a short period of time, about a month and a half maybe. I took private tutoring.

    They do, indeed, use the books of ibn Saud university. I can’t compare them to other books as I’ve never tried other books nor been to other institutes…

    I already had a background in Arabic so I began from around the 4th or 5th level in reading, and the 5th or 6th in grammar.

    I learned quite a bit during my stay there. Basically I finished one level…

  17. IbnMuhammad said:

    Salam,

    Akhi ibn Ahmed, it would be great if you could tell us a little about Qortoba, their services and teaching methods.

    Also so information about living in Alex, like rent prices, food and general info on islamic environment.

    Jazakallah Khair

  18. Ibn Muhammad-I’m having difficulties with the scanner but as soon as its been fixed I’ll upload it for you Inshaa’Allaah.

    The story lines have no correlation to one another so you can pick up any one of the books and you won’t get lost at all. However, some of the books are simpler, less text, bigger font etc so its more suited for a beginner.

  19. Asalamo Aleiklum

    may Allah bless you and give you jannah. Amiin

    If I do the three book of medina both the english version and the arabic version and the three book of al arabiyyatu bayna yadayk and after that the third book of kitab al asasi, when i have done those books can i be able to read classical works and go into more arabic grammar like ajromiyya and alfiyyatu ibnu malik

    p.s inshAllah i’m doing the books in a non arabic country but alhamdulillah i have a teacher

    Asalamo aleikum

  20. Wa ‘alaykum salaam warahmatullaah,

    I don’t see why not, by then you should have a strong understanding of the language Inshaa’Allaah.

    Aameen, wa anta aydan. Allaah yahfadak.

  21. IbnMuhammad said:

    Salam,

    Akhi Ahlaam did you manage to scan some of the matterial from Ibn Saud Program. Inshallah try emailing it to me if you can.

  22. Sorry Akhee but I do not own Ibn Saud texts, I think you must have confused with the story books I was talking about?

    Alf Salaam

  23. Assalaam brother,

    Like the Akh said do try Tayyibun Institute- I have to say in London they are by far the best and cost effective, private tuition is quite expensive generally, which is kind of understandable really so try their three months structured courses insha’allah.

    Wa Assalaam,

    Khalis

  24. Saad Siddiqui said:

    how is qortoba institute, do you think a person will learn a good amount of arabic in 6 months (ie. will he able to conversate, read , write) and who are the scholars we can benefit from in Alexandria?

    JazakAllaho Khayr

    your help will be really appreciated.

  25. As-salaamu’alaykum warahmatullaah,

    I’ve never been to Qortoba so I can’t say anything bounding but from what I have heard, it has been all good. You can achieve alot in 6 months if you’re focused and you don’t fall into the traps that many of the student fall into. However, you will still be at an intermediate level.

    As for scholars, they are scattered everywhere and sadly us in Western society only want to seek a ‘scholar’ who is famous but if you enter any masaajid then the Imaam or those well versed can be excellent to study with bi’idnillaah.

    Also have a look at this Inshaa’Allaah: http://www.qortoba.net/scholarship.html

    I hope that was of some help Inshaa’Allaah.

  26. asalamu alaikum,

    that was a very helpful, I think i’m interested in doing the kitabul asasi one. It seems very interesting, do you know how long it would take me to finish all 3 books, also by the end of it will i be good in my arabic?

    how many hours should a student put into their arabic studies to achieve fluency?

    shukran

    I await you reponse

  27. wa ‘alaykum salaam warahmatullaah,

    As to how long it takes to complete all 3 books, it depends on the student, if you do one-to-one and put 110% effort into your studies, it can be completed in a year but if you’re more lax about it then I would say 2 years Inshaa’Allaah.

    By the end of it, you should have a very high understanding of the arabic language Inshaa’Allaah. You must also remember that success is dependant upon the student.

    As for fluency, it’s hard to say but the more hours you put into, the more you’ll get out of it.

    ‘Afwan.

  28. الكركي said:

    As salaamu 3alaykom.

    May Allaah reward you for your time. I am a rather advanced student in Arabic(come from an Arabic background, have a good grip of grammar) but I wish to advance my knowledge of Arabic to the point that I wouldn’t be considered ‘a westerner who speaks good Arabic’ but rather a bona fide student of the language, on the university level bi’idhnillaah, and learn the ins and outs of advanced grammar, rhetoric, and poetry. I am planning to head to Egypt in a few months time and would like to ask you: Are there any centers in Egypt that teach Arabic not as a second language but for people that already know it and wish to advance? Would centers like Fajr and Ibaanah etc. fill this role? And also after this stage are there any universities in Egypt one could enroll in to obtain a degree in the language?(again not a degree that says ‘I learned how to speak Arabic’ but something a native speaker of the language would aim for) I apologise for the wordiness of this entry, and I realize I am posting on a rather old blog entry. I ask Allaah to enter you and your loved ones into Jannatul firdaws.

  29. Aameen

    I think Ibaanah would be more suited for you since your Arabic seems grounded and Fajr excels more on speaking and conversing rather than grammar. I would suggest reading something like Ajroomiyya to brush up in the meantime because the last thing you want to do is have to go down on a lower level simply because you’re weak in one part.

    If you finish their whole program, which has three phases I believe, you would have a very strong understanding of the language Inshaa’Allaah, but with everything, it is about you and how far you’re willing to push yourself. Wallaahu’3llam.

    You’ll also have to do alot of reading of various materials.

  30. As-salaam ‘alaikum,
    This article, though old, hit the nail on the head for me. I started learining the language with Tayyibuun in London (Alhamdu-lillah they are good and I would recommend them anytime, anyday & twice on Sundays) using the Madinah books. I later droped out and got myself a personal tutor close to where I live and continued. I should Insha-Allah, be completing bk3 by August. My tutor has asked what I want to do and I was lost btw bayna yadaika & Asaasi. I finally settled for Asaasi with the intention of doing bayna yadaika on my own. I plan on taking a year out with my wife & kids and going to Egypt to study the language & deen later this year and have a few questions which I’d love to have answered:
    Cost/benefit analysis: Alexandria or Cairo?
    Which of the Institutes is located in a place where we’ll find a good primary school for the kids to continue thier school in English.

  31. Wa ‘alaykum salaam warahmatullaah

    May Allaah make it easy upon you and your family, Aameen.

    As for the costs, then Alexandria is cheaper and far less populated. However, there aren’t that many institutes to choose from. So either you fork out a bit or you settle for less.

    I don’t know much about Alexandria but I always suggest people to go to Cairo if they want to study in a short period. You have far more flexibility and it does test one’s patience and levels of perseverance, which hopefully becomes fruitful in the end.

    There are few schools in English in madina nasr, american or British schools but depending on your children’s age I would probably tell you to focus on their deen and to perhaps teach them yourself. Kids are more absorbing and will learn fast and since your only going for a year with your family, this time will be invaluable and when you return, English will still be waiting. This is the mistake a lot of families make. Your children need to study the deen just as much as you do if not more!

    Also you need to have a solid timetable before you go there. What you want to study, where you want to study etc and create a logical timetable for yourself otherwise you’ll completely get overwhelmed and return with very little!

    I hope that was of some help, may Allaah ease your journey, Aameen!

  32. Mohammad said:

    Salaam, jazakaAllahkhayr for this, it is very beneficial. I was just wondering, where can I purchase Kitaabul assassi? How much would I be looking at?

  33. As-salaamu ‘alaykum warahmatullaah,

    Wa iyyak

    You can purchase it on amazon but its expensive! If you know someone in Egypt who will return soon you’re probably better off asking them to get it for you.

    You can find volume one here: http://www.scribd.com/doc/9812613/arabic-alkitab-alasasi

  34. ubaydullaah said:

    as-Salaamu`alaykum.

    Regarding the Ibn Saud Texts, The books are separated into 4 levels. If one was to complete all four levels, they would have a strong grasp on all subjects in Arabic. Each level is put into three sections; al-`uloom al-Deeniyyah, al-lughah-al-Arabiyyah and Kutub al-Musaahabah. Also, Each subject has it’s own book. The subjects are as follows:

    (Level 1) – Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), Kitabus-Suwar (limarhalatil-Istima`), al-qira’a wal-Kitabah, at-Ta`beer, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

    (Level 2) – Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), al-Hadeeth ash-Shareef, al-Qira`ah, at-Ta`beer, al-Kitabah, an-Nahw, as-Sarf, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

    (Level 3) – al-Fiqh, at-Tawheed, Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), al-Hadeeth ash-Shareef, al-ADAB, al-Qira`ah, at-Ta`beer, al-Kitabah, an-Nahw, as-Sarf, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

    (Level 4) – at-Taareekh al-Islamiy, al-Fiqh, at-Tawheed, Duroos minal-Qur`aanil-Kareem (Tafseer), al-Hadeeth ash-Shareef, al-BALAGHAH wan-NAQD, al-ADAB, al-Qira`ah, at-Ta`beer, al-Kitabah, an-Nahw, as-Sarf, Kurraasatul-Khatt, al-Mu`jam (Dictionary for all the subjects in the level) and daleel al-mu’allim (Book for teachers).

    Unfortubately, these books aren’t available for purchase but I heard if you contact the University, they will send it to you, otherwise you can purchase the books from some Maktabaat I know in Cairo. OR, you can download them from http://kalamullah.com/learning-arabic.html

  35. Barakallaahu feek! I’ve copied your comment onto the article and given credit to you, it’ll be a great deal of benefit to alot of people!

    Ramadaan kareem

  36. Assalaamu alaykum,
    i studied at qoroba institute and it was a bad experience.there were many problems with the administration and i had a teacher who was very inexperienced and lacked basic communication skills.the class sizes are large in comparison to other institutes because they get a high amount of russian students only because they pay considerably less and i think this may be why the quality of teachers and the service overall may be low. very few students from other countries study there and those that do only do so because it is really the only institute in alexandria and they are often then having to pay a ridiculus amount for a private class because in a class of 5 or more people u are not going to get anywhere especially as the students in the class tend to be of varying levels and will spend time in the class speaking amongst themselves in their native language.the institute raises the prices and will squeeze as much money as they can from u if they know that you are from a western country.i came away very disappointed and so did a lot of other students, even students that were on a scholarship were frustrated because they were not getting the classes and services that they were led to believe. my advice to anyone who still wants to study there is to get everything agreed in writing through email or on skype like prices,classes, conditions because verbal promises tend not to be adhered to once you have arrived. if you are going to stay in their accomodation i would advise you to request the email of one of the students that you will be living with to get feedback on the quality/cleanliness of the apartment before travelling.

  37. Assalaamu alaykum,
    Although alexandria is more comfortable place to live than cairo i would recommend that if students what to achieve the most from their time they need to be in cairo because there is very little available in alexandria outside of the institute in terms of classes in masjids and dars and i think in order to get a complete understanding of the arabic language extra activities need to be undertaken outside of the institute

  38. I am thinking of going to Qortoba simply to avoid the busy nature of Cairo and to have some clean air.

    Many people have praised Qortoba but it appears many didn’t feel they fitted in the thing is you hear the same stories about fajr center and sibaaway and all others .

    Don’t think we can say this this instistute is bad its suits some people

  39. Taalibah said:

    Asalamu alaikum Sister,
    I was wondering if you could help me in regards to out of centre activites in Medinat nasr area – I currently study Arabic at Markaz Fajr, Tajweed with Dar ul Fajr and Hifdh in the Masjid near Markaz Fajr, I live very locally about 3 mins walk form fajr centre. Apart from these classes I dont know of anything locally in terms of weekly circles or additional arabic classes etc, I’m sure there must be some but i dont know where to look! If im not in class im at home, and occasionally venture out for jumah – so if you could point me in the right direction with any suggestions I would be most grateful.

    Basically I am looking anything Islamic or Arabic oreitaited which is not structered in a centre sort of way – probably held in a mosque.

  40. Abdul-Aziz said:

    salaam,

    Regarding the Ibn Saud syllabus – how long approx does it take to complete this? Is it a four year syllabus?

    Also, where can one study this syllabus?

    jazakhallah khair for any help

  41. Assalamualikum
    I am a Arabic language student from India
    my aim is to understand Quran and islamic text only in arabic
    In that path I have completed all three madinah books but still unable to read classical text either they are tough or I have to watch for every word in dictionary
    so I have decided to study some other book which increases my vacoblary in Quran and islamic text so what should I do ?
    which book should I do ?
    I have Urdu sharah of tafsir jalalain with harakat on them with translation so should I start with that ?
    then if I read Quran or any other book should I memorise as a new words comes or should I find it’s meaning and go on ?
    Please help me as soon as possible
    جزاك الله خيرا

  42. Am currently studying arabiyah bayna yadayk mustawaa 3 after i complete arabiyah bayna yadayk whats your suggestion i do should i tackle kitaab asaasi book 3

  43. Reblogged this on Teaching Mastery for the English Speaking Muslim Child and commented:
    As ya’ll know, I dislike simply reblogging other’s material; however I wanted to ‘press’ this quickly, for benefit in Sha Allah. I will add a few notes later iA and update what we’re leaving for Arabic, aqeedah and academics Al hamdulillah. Those of you following will receive my updating notes automatically in your email or WordPress reader.
    Bismillaah

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